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Easy Guide to Florida Landlord Tenant Law

Under Florida landlord tenant law, tenants have certain rights and responsibilities to which they are entitled.

A person becomes a tenant when they pay rent to live in a mobile home, condo, apartment, or single family home whether there is a lease in place or just a verbal agreement. This is an easy guide to those rights and responsibilities.

1. The Right To Private And Peaceful Possession.

Florida allows landlords to enter a rented unit to inspect it or make necessary or agreed upon repairs.

Reasonable notice is required for entry unless emergency conditions exist.

2. The Right To a Habitable Environment.

A rental unit in Florida must have plumbing that works, access to hot water, have a reasonable amount of security, and be structurally sound.

Any building must meet local safety, health, and building codes.

3. Tenants Must Maintain Their Living Conditions.

A tenant must maintain a rental unit so that it continues meeting all necessary codes.

This means removing trash when necessary, cleaning the unit, and using appliances as they are intended.

Any damages to a unit that is caused by tenant neglect is generally the responsibility of the tenant to pay.

4. Tenants Can Be Evicted Even If Partial Rent Payments Are Received.

If a landlord has issued a notice to quit because of the nonpayment of rent, the eviction procedures can still take place even if they accept a partial payment for past due rent.

Sometimes housing associations can demand that tenants pay rent to them instead of the landlord.

All evictions are handled through the courts.

5. Tenants Have The Right To Their Security Deposit.

A security deposit must be maintained throughout an entire tenancy.

Landlords must return the full amount within 15 days of moving out or provide a detailed statement of deductions from the security deposit.

Interest on this amount may be required to be paid in certain circumstances.

If a tenant does not provide a forwarding address upon moving out, the may lose the right to claim any remainder to the deposit.

This guide is not intended to cover every potential situation that may occur under a Florida rental agreement between a tenant and landlord.

Be sure to consult with Florida’s landlord tenant law to receive specific answers for your situation or consult with a legal professional.

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