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How To Seal Grout in Shower

Grout is naturally porous, which makes it a great addition to the shower.

The only problem is that if you leave the grout in your shower unsealed, that porous nature becomes a disadvantage.

Once mildew, mold, water minerals, and other contaminants get into the grout, it can be costly and time consuming to repair the issue. That’s why knowing how to seal grout in the shower is to your advantage.

You’ll want to seal the grout after it has dried when first installed and then every year afterward for the best results.

Here’s what you’re going to need to do.

1. Allow Your Grout To Completely Dry.

For new installations, it will take up to 72 hours for your grout to completely dry.

For a yearly sealant update, you’ll want to avoid using your shower for at least 24 hours for best results.

2. Make Sure Your Grout Is Clean.

You’ll need to scrub by hand every grout line in your shower to prepare it for the sealant.

Use clean water and a course scrubbing pad while wearing protective gloves for this process. Breathing protection may also be necessary.

Once every line has been scrubbed, use a clean cloth or sponge to wipe away the grout debris.

Then you’ll need to allow the grout in the shower to dry for up to 24 hours once again.

3. Prepare The Sealant.

Most sealants for shower grout need to be poured into an applicator bottle.

There may also be some elements which need to be mixed together.

Follow the preparation instructions on your preferred sealant, make sure your applicator or bottle is securely fastened, and then make sure your room has been properly ventilated.

4. Completely Saturate The Grout With The Sealant.

You’ll want to go down the center of each grout line and let the sealant completely saturate the surface.

It is common for some of the sealant to get onto your tile and other shower fixtures, so make sure you have some dry paper towels on hand to blot up the excess sealant which escapes from the grout.

Work in small sections around the shower, making sure to get every grout line, and allow the sealant to dry for 5-10 minutes or as indicated by the product.

5. Apply a Second Coat Of Sealant.

Once you’ve completed each grout line in your shower, removed extra sealant, and allowed it to dry properly, then you’ll need to repeat the process.

Every grout line will need to receive a second coat.

Work in small sections once again, removing any extra sealant that gets onto your tile, as you cover the entire shower.

6. Hazy Tiles Indicate There Is Still Sealant On Them.

As you begin cleaning up your tiles as the second coat begins to cure, you’ll notice that some seem to have a hazy appearance on them.

This is an indication that you have removed all of the excess sealant on that tile.

Using a dry paper towel, work in a circular motion to clean the tile, being careful near the edges to not disrupt the curing sealant.

7. You Can Keep Adding More Layers Of Grout Seal If Needed.

If you’re concerned that two coats of sealant are not enough to give your shower grout an adequate level of protection, then you can place 1 or several more after each coat has properly dried.

You’ll know that you have enough sealant on your grout when water beads on the surface instead of being absorbed by the grout.

8. Allow The Final Coat To Properly Cure.

Follow the instructions on your preferred sealant as to the length of time it needs to cure.

Do not use the shower for this period of time. A humid environment may also affect the integrity of the curing process, so avoid having a steamy bath while the grout sealant is drying to achieve the best results possible.

Solvent-based sealants tend to last longer, but water-based sealants are generally safer to apply, especially in confined environments.

If the tiles aren’t getting clean with dry rubbing, you can use a damp cloth on them.

Just be careful not to place a wet cloth on drying sealant as this will affect the integrity of the curing process.

Knowing how to seal grout in the shower will help you maintain a healthy environment that can withstand the rigors of high moisture levels.

If you don’t know when the last time your shower grout was sealed, then follow these steps today to preserve your bathroom.

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