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Landlord’s Guide to Security Deposits: What You Need to Know

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When you rent out your home to someone, they will often pay a security deposit. Security deposits are a necessary part of renting out property. They are meant to protect landlords from damages after the tenant moves out and, in some cases, may be used to cover unpaid rent. But what if the tenant damages the home or doesn’t pay their rent? Your landlord’s guide to security deposits will teach you what to do in these situations and more. Read on for everything you need to know about security deposits!

What is a Security Deposit?

A security deposit is a sum of money that tenants pay to the landlord upon moving in and that is refunded at the end of their tenancy. Security deposits can often be used as a way for landlords to protect themselves from damages, or in some states, unpaid rent. No matter how well you screen your tenants or how wonderful they may otherwise be, a single missed paycheck can result in unpaid rent or damage could also happen-and not being prepared for it can prove costly! It’s better to have something secured than nothing at all!

The Tenant’s Responsibilities

Tenants have responsibilities when it comes to renting property. They must pay rent on time and maintain the property. If they don’t take care of the property or pay their rent, the landlord can do certain things to make sure they get your money back. For example, if the tenant doesn’t take care of the property or pay the rent (in some states), you can:

  • Take legal action against the tenant
  • Put their name on a credit bureau list
  • Keep their security deposit

If your tenant breaks any agreement with you, you are allowed to do any or all of these things. 

What To Do If a Tenant Breaks Your Rules

We all know that when renting out a property, you need to prepare for the worst. If your tenant breaks your rules, there are a few steps you can take in order to protect yourself and your home.

If your tenant damages something like the dishwasher or bathroom, it’s important as a landlord to keep detailed records of what was damaged and how much it cost to replace. This will help you if it comes time to evict the tenant. This also helps with backing up your decision to withhold part or all of the security deposit as a result of the damage the tenant caused.

If a tenant becomes problematic enough to warrant eviction, you’ll want to consult with an attorney to find out what steps you need to take to evict them legally and as quickly as possible. If you skip any steps or don’t handle the eviction completely legally, you can give the tenant the ability to stay longer and cost you more money.

What To Do If the Tenant Damages Your Property

The tenant will often be liable for any damages to the property – unless they have renter’s insurance. This is why it is important to make sure your security deposit covers the cost of these damages. Of course, it’s not always easy to predict if damage will occur or how much it will cost to repair. That’s why you need to take these precautions before renting out your property:

  • Make an agreement with the tenant about cleaning up after themselves and the process for any repairs that are needed
  • Take photos of everything before they move in and agree on what needs to be fixed before they move in
  • Get a signed agreement/contract with the tenant that states exactly what furniture, appliances, and other items are included in the rental agreement and what condition they are in – this will eliminate confusion over wear and tear or damage caused by tenants later down the road

Once you do these things, you should be in a position to easily determine whether the tenant gets their security deposit back and if they cause damage, how much of the security deposit to withhold for repairs.

When the tenant leaves, you should also take these steps:

  • Do a walk-through with the tenant to assess the status of the rental property
  • Take photos of everything and document specific instances of damage
  • Provide tenant with a detailed list of the damage caused and what it will cost to repair

When you take these steps, you ensure that the tenant understands why you are withholding part or all of their security deposit, if necessary. You also provide them with documentation in the event that they try to sue you for the security deposit, setting yourself up for a stronger court case.

How To Calculate A Security Deposit

A security deposit is often a certain number of months’ rent – typically one or two months. But how much you can charge is based on where you live. You need to familiarize yourself with the laws in your area. You’ll also need to look at the market itself. If other landlords are charging just one months’ rent, it’s going to be difficult for you to charge two or three months’ and find tenants. 

Security deposits are a landlord’s best friend. A security deposit is a small amount of money that a tenant pays to the landlord, in addition to monthly rent, in order to use the property as their home. The deposit is used to cover any damages that the tenant may cause to the property, or if they stop paying rent, which means the landlord won’t have to go through any legal proceedings to get their money back. It’s important that you know your rights and responsibilities as a landlord so you can avoid any conflicts and go about your business as usual.

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